December 01 ,2015 | by Erin O’Neill

UK female high-earners remain at 27% of British workforce

UK female high-earners

There has been no growth in the percentage of British women who earn high salaries over the past four years, with the figure sticking at 27%.

According to a report from law firm Clyde & Co, which analysed HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) data, there has been a financial flatlining for females.

Static salaries

Clyde & Co found that there is a definite trend towards static salaries for women, with the proportion of females who pay the higher rate of tax remaining at 27% for the past four financial years.

There are 4.47 million higher rate tax payers, i.e. those who declare an income between £31,786 and £150,000, and the number of women stands at 1.21 million.

The new figures are the latest study to reflect the 'gender pay gap' and add fuel to the arguments for greater transparency in the publication of salary data by employers.

Further initiatives

Employment partner at Clyde & Co Charles Urquhart commented: "Over 40 years since we saw the first legislation aimed at tackling differences between the sexes in the workplace, these further initiatives, and the intent behind them, are welcome."

"We don't know yet precisely what figures employers will be required to publish but if it's simply a matter of reporting an average of men and women's basic pay and bonuses every three years, it won't tell us much more than we already know," he added.

Clyde & Co also pointed out that improved childcare support, maternity leave and other family-friendly initiatives could be positive moves in tackling gender related pay issues. 

Erin O’Neill

Erin O’Neill is an LSBF News Writer who reports on small business, careers, technology and education news.

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